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Why Germany?

The Federal Republic of Germany is situated in the heart of Europe. 82 million people live here, of whom 7,3 million are foreigners. Germany has nine neighbours: Denmark to the north, the Netherlands and Belgium to the north-west, France and Luxembourg to the west, Austria and Switzerland to the south, the Czech Republic and Poland to the east. Nearly half the German people live in 85 towns with a population of more than 100.000. A lively, multicultural scene thrives in the population centres. “Studentville”, often located in a historical part of town, is where you can find everything your heart desires: bars with live music, antiquarian bookshops, second-hand bicycles.

Did you know that one hundred years ago half of all students studying abroad were actually studying in Germany? At that time, Germany was a magnet for all those keen on getting top-class education and training. And the country can indeed look back on a long university tradition. The oldest university in present-day Germany is the Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg, founded in 1386. But other institutions of higher education can also look back on a history spanning several centuries.

There are good reasons to study in Germany today as well:

  • With more than 400 higher education institutions across the country, Germany has a density of universities which is practically unequalled around the world.
  • The cost of living for students in Germany can be kept low by using many of the student benefits and discounts. On average, you will need around 794 Euros per month (per 2014).
  • With roughly 100 million native speakers, German is the most widely-spoken first language in Europe. The strength of German business and industry and the increasing global activities of German companies and corporations means that the German language is also becoming increasingly important in the international market.
  • The wide range of leisure activities and pastimes offered by the universities and colleges are complemented by numerous opportunities outside the university grounds. Sport, culture or simply having a good night out – something is offered for each and every taste.
  • Many German higher education institutions offer courses leading to an international degree. These courses are designed to attract foreign students and Germans looking to study with an international dimension. The range of study opportunities covers undergraduates, graduate and postgraduate degree courses (Bachelor’s, Master’s, PhD levels). Courses and lectures are taught in English, often exclusively during the first year of study. German language courses are offered before and during the program.
  • Students normally don’t have to pay tuition fees at German universities, and if so, the fees are very low. Most German universities receive considerable financing from the government. Bachelor’s degree programmes are usually tuition-free at public universities. Some master’s degree programmes, however, come with tuition fees, but they’re not as high as in other countries.

These are some websites regarding studying in Germany:
www.higher-education-compass.de
www.studienwahl.de
www.study-in.de